Modern construction is a perfect example of how checklists can help us manage the complexity of modern life. In today’s complex and interdependent world, failure to communicate is the cause of most of our ineptitude. Different people or teams have different bits of knowledge to complete a project, but failure to communicate that information between the various groups and individuals can cause big-time breakdowns that lead to setbacks, or abject failure.
This isn’t a problem unique to medicine, of course. It exists across almost every domain of life, be it business or science or even just getting things done around the house or on your car. More and more of our work requires coordinating different teams to get a task done. If you work for a big corporation, you’re likely collaborating with a whole host of people to complete a project. And just as in medicine, you’ve likely seen projects delayed or even fail not because of lack of know-how, but due to head-scratching ineptitude.
Checklist makes it easy to get started using checklists, with a built-in repository of checklists submitted by users that you can browse and use. You can find lists for almost anything here, from SEO to property inspections to camping. Add the lists you need to your account, or build your own checklists from scratch, and you can get started organizing your workflows without much hassle.
Healthcare safety activists have looked to checklists to solve a myriad of problems, particularly with the current iteration of checklists that have been imported from aviation. Large-scale implementations with conflicting outcomes suggest that these tools are not as simple or effective as hoped. Scholars debating the efficacy of checklist implementation in healthcare have identified important reasons for varying results: that success requires complex, cultural and organisational change efforts, not just the checklist itself2; that results may be confounded by a mix of the technical and socioadaptive elements,3 and that local contexts may either augment or undermine the implementation's outcomes.4
Concerns have recently been fuelled by the disappointing results after implementation of the checklist in Michigan17 and large-scale mandated implementation in Ontario Canada.5 Interpretations of results are also complicated by reported differences between perceived and actual application of the checklist. In a recent US study, hospital documentation indicated 100% compliance with checklists, but observers found that on average only 4 of 13 checklist items were actually completed.18 Even strong advocates for checklists admit that full implementation of the WHO checklist is difficult and that improvements require more than the checklist, including strong institutional leadership, data collection, and monitoring, and training in teamwork.4 ,14
Everything seemed fine, until the patient stopped responding and his heart rate skyrocketed. The patient's blood pressure was barely detectable. Nothing his medical team did improved it, so he was rushed to surgery. Only when he was opened up did the doctor finally realize the stab wound went much further inside the patient than he'd thought, cutting right into the aorta—the main artery from the heart. Although it seemed like a small knife wound, the patient had actually been struck by a bayonet—part of the assailant's costume.
When ideas are translated from one industry to another, the assumptions underlying the original concepts may be lost or diluted. As checklists are increasingly imposed through a variety of professional and regulatory mandates in North America,5 Europe6 and elsewhere,7 perhaps it is time to review the fundamental principles of checklist use, including why they might work and how we can implement them better.
It's primarally a to-do list app, but Wunderlist can also be a great tool to create checklists. It's free, runs on just about every device, and is incredibly simple to use. You can't duplicate lists, but you can make a list and share it a Public List. Anyone—on your team or around the globe—can then add the list to their account, check off the items, then add it again whenever needed. It's a workaround, one that might keep you from needing a new app just for making checklists.
It is obvious that one can use a screwdriver as a hammer, but that won’t be efficient. It’s similar with leveraging Git. To make the most of it, you need a recipe to achieve the highest productivity. It is all possible with Git workflows. Besides, a consistent Git workflow ensures more chances to free your development pipeline of unnecessary obstacles. In that case, a checklist is a solution to avoid committing to memory every component of your software development cycle. The tool is able to guide anyone through the workflow jungles including user stories issues, solution coding, forking the code repository, and others.

You need sprint planning to ascertain the relevant context of the product and responsibility for certain tasks. The process itself is a kind of endorsement of the decisions taken during the backlog refinement. The checklist's role is to establish a proper context at every point of the backlog. It is a good practice to shape a separate list for three stages of the session - before, after and during the sprint planning.  In doing so, you will reduce the cognitive load of handling practices.
Perhaps, we have a complete picture of leveraging checklists in such industries as aviation or manufacturing. However, how has this tool proved itself in a more complex workflow - software development? In fact, software teams that follow Agile methodology appreciate the implementation of lists as acceptance criteria solutions, definition of done, progress tracking tools, etc. Moreover, each separate development process has its own advantages.

An example from my own work is the process of creating a new blog post. Although I usually remember the steps of creating the content because it's part of my writing process—writing an outline, doing the research, drafting, and editing—there are plenty of other steps that I can easily forget. Adding images, working through multiple headline options to find the best one, and making sure image credits are correct are all standard tasks that are easy to overlook.
Many prominent software development companies like Railsware are active users of checklists in their activities and processes. They do not limit their lists to 7 or 10 points. Sometimes, the number of points can stretch up to a couple of pages consisting of subsections for rather complicated processes. And here are some reasons why you should consider using checklists for your needs.
Checklists support is another essential point that we decided to place out of the list. Some powerful project management tools have changed their attitude to this feature and enhanced their functionality with integrable plugins like Jira checklist. A bunch of capabilities including the creation of acceptance criteria, definition of done, and other ToDo lists, splitting, arranging, prioritizing, and others became available to multiple users. This superficially subtle innovation shows a growing demand for implementing checklists within PM tools as an integral element of workflow organization.
Whenever he went on business trips, my Dad would always write down the items he would need to take. His checklist would include articles of clothing, types of clothing to take, and personal hygiene items, along with the work-related items he would need. Although I cannot be certain, I strongly suspect he also included lists of work-related issues that he either knew about ahead of time or at the very least he would make a note of to bring up during the trip. That way, he would ensure that nothing would be forgotten by him or left to chance.
 2. Focus only on the “stupid” essential stuff that’s frequently overlooked or skipped. You don’t need a checklist that lists every single step on how to complete a task. That renders a checklist useless. Instead, just focus on putting down the “stupid” but essential stuff that you frequently miss. Your checklist should have no more than 9 items on it. The shorter the better.
NO, I don’t. I call them “to do” lists. LOL! They’re very helpful, they keep me sane and keep stress away. For many years now, I keep a daily list prepped the night before; and a weekly list that’s prepped every Sunday. Keeps things smooth-sailing all the time. So at the end of the day, if all items are crashed-out (as in “done”!), I feel so good about myself. :)
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