Every construction job begins with a massive checklist of tasks that have to get done and each task has an accompanying deadline. While that to-do list plays an important role in ensuring stuff gets done, an equally valuable checklist is also used. Called a “submittal schedule,” it centers on communication. The submittal schedule details which project managers need to talk to which project managers during a specific phase and about a specific process. The submittal schedule’s purpose is to get teams that are working on different yet co-dependent projects to regularly connect so they can discuss any potential sticking points. For example, there might be an item on the checklist for carpenters and plumbers to meet up at a specific time to discuss their progress on their respective tasks. Maybe a problem has come up with the pipes that affects when the carpenters can get started on their work, but perhaps there’s something the carpenters can do to help the plumbers. The trick is to keep each other in the loop so each respective team can take care of these “known unknowns” as quickly and as effectively as they can. Once the teams talk, they check the communication task as complete, and move on with their work.
Donald, I like the article man. One way that I’ve utilized checklists in my life is by utilizing Nozbe. It’s both an app for browser on computer as well as iPhone and Android compatible. Essentially it is an electronic checklist for helping with daily tasks as well as for projects involving multiple people. Check it out, it’s saved me a bunch of time!
Everything seemed fine, until the patient stopped responding and his heart rate skyrocketed. The patient's blood pressure was barely detectable. Nothing his medical team did improved it, so he was rushed to surgery. Only when he was opened up did the doctor finally realize the stab wound went much further inside the patient than he'd thought, cutting right into the aorta—the main artery from the heart. Although it seemed like a small knife wound, the patient had actually been struck by a bayonet—part of the assailant's costume.
Travel checklist. I also have a checklist that I use before I leave on an extended trip. It’s kind of a combo of a to-do list and a routine list. It’s stuff I need to get done, but I use the same list every time. And it’s a DO-CONFIRM checklist: I do my prep from memory but then check the list before I leave to verify that I took care of everything essential. These are the things that I’ve had the most trouble remembering in the past, so they’re on my list:
It is obvious that they spend a lot of time building a strong Internet marketing system to quickly and effectively popularize their business and can gain higher profits. However, this does not mean all of them can handle the field, as the tasks involved intensive knowledge and skills. Therefore,naturally, they will turn to high-profile Internet marketers to solve their troubles.
We may not like to admit it, but many of us can describe a time when we’ve made a mistake during the progress of a study. These mistakes can range from mixing up wires or forgetting to turn on an amplifier to forgetting to collect an essential piece of information that either requires additional processing time or prevents you from analyzing a certain variable altogether. Increased computing power and technological advancements have also made it easier than ever to collect data. We can collect five measures simultaneously in one study and hundreds of trials in no time at all. But where does this leave us now? We must set up all of this equipment and make sure it works together, monitor it as well as our participant or specimen, and somehow sift through all the data post hoc. Even with a detailed lab notebook, its no wonder problems can arise. Even just writing this makes me feel…exposed, as if I’m the only one who struggles with this. It seems so simple, how can I not get it perfect every time? I always thought that I just had to work harder to not miss small steps, but maybe I just needed a different, yet structured, perspective on how to manage such a high volume of complex information.
Daniel Bryant sat down with Dave Sudia, senior DevOps engineer at GoSpotCheck, to discuss the benefits of PaaS; building a platform with Kubernetes as the foundation; selecting open source components and open standards in order to facilitate the evolution of a platform; and why care should be taken to prioritize the developer experience and create self-service operation of the platform.
When it comes to checklist implementation, it is important to recognise that aviation checklists are integral to the normal workflow. The aircraft does not stop while the checklist is completed, and the timing of checklist completion is arranged so that it does not conflict with other essential flight activities. To that end, the checklist does not impose an additional burden or workload, but is actually perceived by aircrew as something that makes the flight easier. In contrast, the Time Out is performed before the case can begin, so essentially stands independently of the workflow. To that end, the Time Out is likely to be seen as something additional, and, unless it results in obvious time-saving downstream, will be perceived as an increase in workload. This mixture of purpose between checklist and briefing, in combination with implementation issues, may explain the range of outcomes as well as the range of enthusiastic to skeptical opinions about the mandated use of checklists in surgery.14–16
NO, I don’t. I call them “to do” lists. LOL! They’re very helpful, they keep me sane and keep stress away. For many years now, I keep a daily list prepped the night before; and a weekly list that’s prepped every Sunday. Keeps things smooth-sailing all the time. So at the end of the day, if all items are crashed-out (as in “done”!), I feel so good about myself. :)
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