‘Non-boldface’ checklists form part of the normal framework of ‘job aids’, which might also include mnemonics and other rote learning tools, task visibility, context-sensitive help functions, decision support and instruction manuals. Mnemonics (such as ‘ABC’ for ‘Airway, Breathing, Circulation’ in resuscitation), for example, are sometimes used to retrieve procedural items where participants are likely to be subject to high cognitive load; however, mnemonics are more critical in situations where there is no later access to a physical checklist for confirmation.

To build a proper testing checklist you need to take into account not only the product requirements and user stories, but also cover a wider spectrum of implementation. At the same time, the test scope should be narrow enough to focus on a product’s functionality. It is also important to make separate tests for different parts or elements of activity. For example, a purchase activity on a website may consist of three parts - signing in, adding products to the cart, and signing out. Splitting your checklists for testing procedures will isolate test failures and keep the focus on the essential details.


Thanks for this great post. I was very skeptical about the idea for being an automaton by following a checklist or a schedule of all day, day or mounth. And then my life was a real impasse. I ignore what great things I did it and so for. Afte that I decided to get a plan of my live. I decided to savor my live by listing waht I did and what I want to do.
This isn’t a problem unique to medicine, of course. It exists across almost every domain of life, be it business or science or even just getting things done around the house or on your car. More and more of our work requires coordinating different teams to get a task done. If you work for a big corporation, you’re likely collaborating with a whole host of people to complete a project. And just as in medicine, you’ve likely seen projects delayed or even fail not because of lack of know-how, but due to head-scratching ineptitude.
Checklists put everything you need to do right in front of you. You can see the beginning, middle and end of what needs to be done. Though this helps some people tackle tasks in front of them, it can also be distracting. If you are the type who prefers to take things one step at a time, you might enjoy working through a checklist. Big picture people might struggle with a large collection of isolated items, however, and might need other tools such as mind maps, ideas lists and deadline reminders to help them focus on what needs to be done.
To-do lists are definitely awesome for getting things done, but there’s another kind of checklist as well – what I call the “routine checklist.” With a routine checklist, you write down all the steps/tasks needed to complete a certain project or process. The list of tasks never changes. You use the same checklist over and over again, every time you do that particular process/project.
NO, I don’t. I call them “to do” lists. LOL! They’re very helpful, they keep me sane and keep stress away. For many years now, I keep a daily list prepped the night before; and a weekly list that’s prepped every Sunday. Keeps things smooth-sailing all the time. So at the end of the day, if all items are crashed-out (as in “done”!), I feel so good about myself. :)
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